Caroline Bianchi - RE/MAX Acclaim

Posted by Caroline Bianchi on 3/2/2018

There’s so much to consider when to comes to buying a new home. The first issue is that of your finances. You need to make sure that you’re preparing financially for the home search, and not just making your list of “wants” for a new home. It’s an exciting time when you’re purchasing your first home, but don’t let the excitement overtake your responsibility. Here’s some tips to keep you on the financial straight and narrow path when preparing to buy a home: Be Mindful Of Your Credit Score There’s many factors that can affect your credit score. Applying for new credit cards is one of those factors. Your credit score will drop a few points every time you have a new credit inquiry or open a new account. If you do get approved for new credit, lenders may have concerns that you’ll spend up maxing out your new approved credit limit on that account and possibly default on your loan. Closing credit accounts is another factor that greatly affects your credit score. You may think that closing unused accounts is a good idea to help get yourself financially ready for becoming a homeowner. This isn’t true. Closing accounts lowers your amount of overall available credit. This means that your debt-to-credit ratio is larger. This lowers your overall credit score. You can certainly make these smart financial changes after you close on your new home. Keep Records When you move your money around, make sure you have records of it. Your lender will want to know about any unusual deposits and withdrawals. You’ll need to prove where your money comes from. All of the cash that you’ll be using for your home purchase should be in one account before you apply for a mortgage. Keep Up With Your Bills Don’t increase your debt. This will have an affect on the very important debt-to-income ratio which is one of the most vital aspects of loan approval. Also, be sure that you don’t skip your payments on bills. Your history of payments is incredibly important as well. Be sure that you continue to make full, on-time payments on all of your bills. Keep Your Job Even though a new job could mean a raise, or a better situation for you and your family, it could delay you in getting a mortgage. You’ll need to have your employment verified along with pay stubs to prove your source of income. Lenders like to see a longer employment history. Keep Saving The biggest up front costs in buying a home is that of closing costs and the down payment. Those must be paid at the time of closing. Lenders may even verify that your savings is on hand. Keep saving steadily and be sure to keep your savings in place.

Posted by Caroline Bianchi on 10/27/2017

Mortgage blind spots could be dangerous, especially if you are living on a tight budget. Blind spots are generally tied to unexpected fees and emotions that cause you to overlook what would otherwise be obvious. A common mortgage blind spot has to do with the loan origination process.

Loan processing fees are just the start

Included in loan origination costs are underwriting and processing fees. These fees pay for work that lenders perform to evaluate the financial help of loan requesters. During the evaluation, lenders might also evaluate the condition and financial value of a house.

Loan origination costs aren't the only hidden mortgage fees that could increase the amount of money that you pay to own your home. Total costs of loan origination fees could top one percent of the total price on a house. That's more than $1,500 on a house priced at $150,000.

Then, there is mortgage insurance, homeowners insurance and homeowner's association fees. Other than mortgage insurance costs, these expenses may be more commonly known about. What you may not expect to pay when applying for a mortgage are:

  • Mortgage application fees (Depending on the lender, you might be able to negotiate your way out of paying mortgage application fees. This is a time when it might be worth it to let your real estate agent lobby for you, working to gain you a win.)
  • Title fees (Similar to how you receive a title on a car, truck, motorcycle or boat that you purchase, you should receive a title to your house after you pay the mortgage off. Title fees are not free. But, this doesn't mean that you have to pay high title fees. You or your real estate agent can shop around for good title fee prices.)
  • Courier fees (These fees are associated with closing costs. Although relatively small, courier fees could be easily overlooked when buying a house.)
  • Mortgage prepayment fees (To protect their financial investment, some lenders ask homeowners to pay several months of their mortgage in advance. Sign a mortgage that has mortgage prepayment fees stipulated in the writing and you could be hit with late prepayment penalties.)
  • Discount points (These fees can be negotiated. Handle these negotiations the right way and you could end up paying lower closing costs.)
  • Late fees (As they do with bank account fees, mortgage late fees can add up, reaching into thousands of dollars.)
  • Unexpected home inspections (Depending on the lender, you could be hit with fees associated with unexpected home inspections that your mortgage lender makes.)

Financial institutions are in business to earn money, to turn a profit. Unscrupulous financial institutions aren't the only organizations that charge homeowners hidden mortgage fees. Well known and highly respected lenders also tack hidden mortgage fees onto loans.

The only time when you might become aware of hidden mortgage fees is when you are late making a payment. You also might become aware of hidden mortgage fees if you fall behind in your mortgage payments and your loan goes into default.

Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Caroline Bianchi on 11/20/2015

Getting a mortgage these days can be tough and it is even tougher for small-business owners. Potential self-employed borrowers usually have variability in their income streams. Today, banks are requiring more financial documentation from all buyers, and self-employed borrowers tend to face more scrutiny. Small-business owners may have a smaller income because they are typically knowledgeable about tax deductions and credits. This often reduces the amount of taxable income they have. Reducing the amount of taxable income on your tax returns means to the lender there is less income to qualify for a loan. There are ways self-employed borrowers can increase their chances of getting a home loan, however. Here are a few tips: What is the lenders history? Find out if the lender has a history of working with self-employed borrowers. Self-employed borrowers should focus more on finding a lender that will understand their situation rather than shop the loan rate. There are individual loan officers who will be able to think out of the box or come up with solutions. The lender you choose is key. Consider portfolio lenders. Portfolio lenders have more flexibility in originating loans because they don't have to sell the loan to Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae. Portfolio lenders hold their own loans. That makes a big difference in their ability to loan. Another option may to consider credit unions. Many credit unions also keep a good portion of loans on their books. Boost your income. Show you make as much money as possible on your tax return. You might need to amend your tax returns. Some lenders will look at a loan application again if they have sent in amended returns to the government. Sometimes by rethinking deductions and credits on income taxes, a borrower can increase his qualifying income. Of course, with this strategy, the borrower would also face a new tax bill.

Posted by Caroline Bianchi on 6/5/2015

Buying your first home can be confusing. Securing a mortgage is one of the most important parts of the home buying process. Making sure that you have the right loan and have chosen the right loan officer are among the things a first time buyer has to do to start the process. Here are some more tips on how to ensure a successful purchase: 1. Make sure your deposit is in order. Talk to your loan officer about what amount of a deposit is required for the purchase and type of loan. You will also want to make sure the funds are accounted for and readily available. You can expect deposits to run anywhere between 3 and 20 percent of the purchase price. 2. Plan to have a cash reserve in addition to your deposit. You may want to have a reserve of at least two months mortgage payments. 3. Ask your lender to go over all the fees that apply to the purchase. It is better to be prepared and know how much the actual purchase will cost. These costs are typically added into your loan but there may be some out of pocket expenses too. 4. Consider how much you can comfortably afford not how much you have been approved for. These numbers may vary considerably. Your mortgage costs should not be more than 30% of your household income. 5. The lowest rate is not always the best deal. You will want to look at not only the rate but also the terms and fees associated with the loan.      

Posted by Caroline Bianchi on 5/1/2015

Who wouldn't like to pay off the mortgage early? Getting rid of mortgage debt will allow you the security and the psychological benefit of owning your home free and clear. There are lots of ways to accomplish these goals. Here are some suggestions on ways to get rid of your mortgage debt. Compare the options and do what works best for you. 1. Add more money to your monthly payment. This will help pay down the principal balance shortening the length of your loan. When you pay more on your principal is gets lower, and the lower your principal gets, the more every payment from then on is applied to principal, as less goes to cover interest expense. 2. Refinance. Refinance your mortgage to 10, 15 or 20 years. Your payments will be higher on a 15-year loan, but often the rate is lower and the loan is paid off much quicker. If you are afraid to take out a 15- year loan take out a 30-year loan, but make payments as if you had a 15-year loan. 3. Make biweekly payments. Most banks have a biweekly payment plan. Since there are 52 weeks in the year if you pay half your regular mortgage payment every other week, you'll have made 26 half-payments, or 13 payments. There are options when it comes to owning your home free and clear. Just decide which one works for you and be on your way to being mortgage free.